Beginnings and entry points

When I started Johnson Farm (my first published novel) I started with events found in the second half of the story as it reads today. Most my first ideas are in the story’s ending.

My entry point into Unintended Consequences (hopefully my second published novel) was, I thought, in the middle of the book. It turns out my entry point is actually the beginning of the second book in a trilogy.

A similar thing happened yesterday in a real life conversation, I had to help someone ‘catch up’ to where I was in a conversation so I could make my point.

As writers, this is something that happens all the time; the point where we enter a story is seldom correct entry point, the correct beginning, for the reader. And, the same thing happens in many real-life situations.

A customer may walk in wanting to buy a car, but that doesn’t mean she/he is ready to buy the car you want to sell.

You may need to explain to a doctor what symptoms are bothering you before he/she can find a correct course of treatment.

The students in your class probably need a review of previous studies and a transition into how that stuff relates to the current topic before they’re ready to move on to that capstone project about new material.

Understand who you’re talking to…

It’s said in writing classes all the time, “you need to understand your audience.” Well, here’s a practical example. If you want to persuade, or even entertain, you need to understand where your audience is coming from, and then set up the entry point into your story/lesson/sales pitch or whatever else you want to say or write.

If you’re telling a fantasy story, or a science fiction story, or a horror story or… You need to give your reader some idea of what the rules are before you dump things on them. (Not everything at once, but give them a starting point!)

In any story, fiction or non-fiction, you need to give your reader some orientation to where they are or what’s going on; even if that orientation is “Hey! You have no idea where you are or what’s going on!”

Sure, there can be a twist later. Sure, you can turn the tables on someone in a debate. But if you don’t give the reader/watcher/hearer some grounding, you’re not turning the tables or creating a satisfying twist. Without that grounding you’re cheating, or convincing the reader/watcher/hearer you don’t understand what the @!%”$#@$@$!!!! you’re talking about.

And that’s a sure way to make people unhappy. And unhappy people don’t buy books, do stuff you want them to, learn stuff, or share things with their friends.

But, how do I know where the beginning is?

Well, you might not when you start out. Once you have an idea you need to think about who you’re talking/writing to and figure out what the right beginning point is based on your idea and your audience. That might take effort. It might just mean learning about your audience and your idea.

Remember, texts and tweets are about the only place a first draft is acceptable, and even those first drafts can be iffy. It’s a good idea to think before you hit that send button or return key.

Get a little meta. Think about what your purpose is and who you’re talking to, not just your content.

In the last few years I’ve talked to several people about the subject of diabetes. One of the best started with, “So, what do you know about diabetes?’ The single worst started with hand puppets.

The presenter who asked “What do you know?” was coming in at the last minute and was doing an impromptu presentation. The one with hand puppets knew for at least a week that she was doing a continuing education class for a group of mental health and social work folks (most of whom had master’s degrees!).

It doesn’t matter how much time you have to prepare if you don’t think about your audience. If you don’t think about them and start at the wrong place, you will struggle.

It’s the nature of life dear reader. We love our own ideas. We understand our own views and positions better than those of others (If we don’t understand our own, it actively hinders us in understanding other people’s…). But, we can’t just assume that the person we’re talking to is at the same place. We have to find the right beginning for the person we’re trying to communicate with.

Otherwise, there’s a really good chance he/she will be too confused and annoyed to go with us through the whole story, much less to do something more.

Knowing where to begin is a success skill. It creates a foundation on which we build.

That’s it for this one dear reader. Find your beginnings, help others understand what you have to say. And, I’ll see you next post…

Self-Incentivizing

There are lots of reasons to write: money, prestige, getting to tell our stories, and sharing the things we love, among others. But, sometimes these reasons alone aren’t enough of a push.

A book can take a year or more to go to press. It could be months before you hear about that story submission. Royalties can seem small and advances aren’t what they used to be. There are times we feel like tearing our hair out if we have to work on that manuscript one more time. Sometimes having secondary motivators, stuff that’s fairly immediate and close to our non-writing interests, is helpful.

These secondary motivators really can be helpful in getting us over the bumps. While I hate the term retail therapy, I have found there are times it’s helpful to have a tangible reward on my radar. So, I set tangible rewards for making interim goals, step goals, and even the big ones. When I hit the rough spots those tangible things, the rewards I can touch and feel and are so much closer than seeing the book in print, help carry the day. That rough NANOWRIMO in 2017, the one where I set a personal best for words written; it was worth a black powder pistol for my collection.

That short story I keep grumbling is “just a short story”? Yeah, it’s worth $20.00 toward coins, electronics, or some other larger goal item I have in mind. One 500-4,000 word story might not be enough of an achievement for one of the big things I want, but by getting it done and putting a twenty in that lock box, I’m that much closer. It gives me the extra boost I need sometimes, and eventually I’ve earned that whatever it is I want.

My secondary incentives give me plannable, measurable, rewards that can be tied immediately to achieving goals and getting writing done (which is good because the delays associated with some of those primary motivators can be enthusiasm killers).

This week I’m ending with a question: What do you do to reward yourself for writing goals? Leave a comment if you have something that helps you, and I’ll see you next post.